Entertainment
Celebrity Then And Now
Publication: RidiculouslyExtraordinary.
Posted by Ryan Neal
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
Entertainment
Celebrity Then And Now
Publication: RidiculouslyExtraordinary. Posted by Ryan Neal
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
Hank Williams Jr.

Birthdate:
May 26, 1949
Famous Years:
1964-Present
Currently Known For:
The Party's On
Networth:
$45 Million
Famous For:
All My Rowdy Friends Are Coming Over Tonight
Hank Williams Jr.



  Birthdate:
May 26, 1949

  Famous Years:
1964-Present

  Currently Known For:
The Party's On



  Networth:
$45 Million

  Famous For:
All My Rowdy Friends Are Coming Over Tonight


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Many of us know what it’s like to follow in our parents’ footsteps, and it can be hard to live up to the billing. Certain entertainers have been able to find success while living in a parent’s shadow, and that includes country singer Hank Williams, Jr. For more than 50 years, Williams, Jr. has been performing his brand of music that has certainly found an audience, and now has a son that’s done the same. Now nearing his 70s, Williams, Jr. is still playing for audiences today, and has become synonymous with a certain sports program that draws millions of viewers.

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Williams was born in Shreveport, Louisiana on May 26, 1949 to a pair of musicians. His mother Audrey had released several songs throughout the 1950s, while his father Hank, Sr. had many country hits of his own with “Your Cheatin’ Heart” and “Hey, Good Lookin’”. Sadly, Williams’s father would pass away when he was just four years old. That wouldn’t stop him chasing the same dream that the elder Williams would, however, as he was only a teenager when he started to get into the country music scene.

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His father had been very influential, and some of his famous friends in the business would teach Williams how to play and hone his craft. Williams had his first album released in 1964 when he sang the songs that his father made famous. He released three albums that year, with two reaching the top 15 on the country charts, while “Your Cheatin’ Heart” climbed into the top 20 of the mainstream charts. He’d continue to release album after album throughout the rest of the 1960s, mostly singing like his father would, and reaching the top 40 of the charts multiple times.

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His biggest hit album at the time would come in 1969 with “Songs my Father Left Me” that topped the country charts, and it would be a long time until he’d not get close to the top of the country ranks. Williams’s sound would continue to emulate his father’s sound, but that would change in the 1970s when he was looking for something unique he could call his own. He’d switch over from more of a rebel country sound to what was more along the lines of what’s considered southern rock, like you’d hear from Charlie Daniels.

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This new sound would be debuted in 1975 with his album “Hank Williams Jr. and Friends” that ended up being a big hit for Williams, allowing him to continue his new sound. Unfortunately, right around this time, he almost lost his life while mountain climbing when he took a tumble of several hundred feet that required him to undergo multiple surgeries, leaving him temporarily unable to sing. Because of this, it would be two years before he came out with his next album, making his return with “One Night Stands”.

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Throughout the 1980s, Williams would continue to be one of the biggest stars in all of country music, and his new take on the genre helped country to become more mainstream, and more like what it is today. He’d finish out the decade with six straight records that topped the country charts, and all of his albums would end up charting on the mainstream’s top 200. Several of his albums went platinum, and the man known as “Bocephus” established himself as a country music legend.

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While he didn’t enjoy the same type of success in the 1990s as he did in the previous decade, he was still selling plenty of albums and establishing chart success. He’s taken a step back in terms of churning out albums ever since then, releasing just three albums since 2009. His most recent release was 2016’s “It’s About Time”, which was his highest charting album since 1990’s “Lone Wolf”.

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Of all of his songs, perhaps his most memorable hit came with his song “All My Rowdy Friends Are Coming Over Tonight” that was adapted into a weekly song about competing teams on “Monday Night Football”. The song would be used as the opener for the program starting in 1989. It was taken away in 2011 when Williams made his personal political beliefs known in an interview, and ESPN removed the song. However, it would return in 2017, and has been back on the Monday Night Football intro ever since.

The 69 year old Williams is still performing, and both his son Hank III and daughter Molly have gotten into the music scene, as well. Hank III has been known for songs such as “Country Heroes” and “Low Down”, while Holly has had songs like “Keep the Change” and “Mama”. The Williams family has been a staple in country music for a very long time, now, and it appears that it’s going to keep being that way for quite some time.

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As for his own legacy among the general public, Williams says “You know that song - what does it say? ‘Don’t Call Me an Icon. I don’t care about the Hall of Fame. I’m going to live my life in my country boy kind of way.’ Oh, they’re real baby. Them songs are real.”


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