This is a guest post from Tanja Hoagland at www.minimalistpackrat.com.

I've got two questions for you:

1) What ridiculously extraordinary thing do you want to do?

2) Why aren't you doing it right now?

I suppose I'm an under-achiever because my first ridiculously extraordinary goal in life was basic. I didn't want to work for someone else. You read that right. My goal wasn't to be self-employed. It wasn't to build a huge business empire. I just didn't want to get up and clock in at nine on Monday morning.

Slacker of the year award? Heh. Not a chance in hell. I had never moved my way up past the bottom of the totem pole. We're talking cashier jobs, stocking jobs, and the height of my glory, a newsletter design job making eleven bucks an hour. And let me tell you, people at the bottom of the totem pole work just as hard as those at the top. They're just working hard for other people instead of themselves. It was difficult to create something successful out of my life with no real equity, no possibilities of real equity and the most dreaded fact of all, squeezing in "real work time" after a full 40 hours every week.

Evidently I wasn't alone in my dissatisfaction with the working world. A poll from Gallup shows that less than 50% of people are satisfied with their work. Less than 50%! That's a lot of unhappiness rolling around. But hey, I had my ridiculously extraordinary goal in hand and I was gonna succeed at it.

I'm nothing if not persistent. I kept ramming my head against that wall. I knew I could say good-bye to the world of bosses. I knew that my previous attempts at businesses had failed. I knew that meant it was time for a new approach. With that persistence in hand what was my second magic ingredient? I believed I could do it.

What you believe you can achieve. It sounds like a cheesy motivation poster hanging on a wall. But wait, did you know there's really something to that? Yeah. Researcher Harold Stevenson from the University of Michigan found that student's beliefs about their chances of achievement affected their ability to achieve. Jennifer Mangels appeared in the Oxford Journal with similar research results, that belief about success influences the outcome.

With these two magic ingredients you can make anything happen. It's a serious mojo combination. What does belief and perseverance look like in action? I'll use myself as the example.

1) Create a vision for what you want. (Having my own business and being my own boss.)

2) Look at the costs of achieving that goal. (Spending my spare time working my butt off to make it happen.)

3) Decide if those costs are worth it. (They were.)

4) Researching the hell out of how to meet your goal. (Researching successful business models. Investing in training programs. Studying people who have done it.)

5) Creating a never-ending amount of belief and perseverance. (Rinse and repeat. Rinse and repeat.)

In a previous post Karol said, "Throwing away your TV and working from 6pm – 10pm every day and all day on weekends is an attempt at an idea." I'd say Karol is steering us in the right direction with that.

I found an online website building system and worked on my goal every day and on weekends for a couple years. I committed myself to its reality and took the action steps I needed to make it happen. I'm not telling you what that online website system was because that system doesn't really matter. What matters is I got up off my butt and I made a decision.

I gave myself serious consequences for failure. I was over thirty with a nice pile of failed business ventures under my belt. I made the decision that if this program didn't work I was going to give up completely on my ridiculously extraordinary dream of not having a boss. I'd buckle in, settle down and work my way up some ladder somewhere. That led me to the most important decision of my life.

I made the decision that this program was damn well going to work for me.

I put the fire under my butt and told myself this program HAD to work. I kept clocking in, doing the 9 to 5. Then in my spare time, and I mean every waking spare moment I had, I worked on my goal. Even when my results were pathetic I kept going. Let's digress into what pathetic means for a moment. I mean 5 cents a day pathetic for months. I mean an insanely grand $5 a month after a full year of busting butt. I kept typing out pages. I kept learning from my mistakes. I kept studying the big dogs. I kept moving forward. Even when that wall didn't budge after two years, I kept ramming my head against the wall. I kept ramming and ramming and ramming until I did it.

You wondering what happened? Fast forward three years and my first site is now at 60,000 + visits a month with just under 20,000 of them being repeat visitors. My honey and I are both self employed with our online business. It's ridiculously extraordinary and now we've got to up the ante and come up with some bigger dreams.

What's it gonna take for you? What does it take to achieve something ridiculously extraordinary?

Thomas Buxton is a smart guy you might not know (he just happened to abolish slavery in the British Empire back in 1833). He said, "With Ordinary talent and extraordinary perseverance all things are attainable." He knew how to succeed.

You gotta have belief and perseverance. A solid goal and some serious research help a lot. But if you really want something you gotta believe it in the marrow of your bones. And then there's a little something called getting your ass in gear that has to happen in the middle of the equation. That's called perseverance. Belief and perseverance. Some "git up and go". Some bam. Keep ramming your head against the wall and the wall will crumble.

Now this is where I'm supposed to tell you that I'm now making a million dollars a month and if you sign up now you can too. Let's scratch all that, because the reason I wrote this has nothing to do with what my goal was. The reason I wrote this was to light the fire under your butt and get you moving towards whatever the heck it is you absolutely freakin' want to be doing, what your soul is begging you to be doing. It might be climbing Mount Everest, it might growing rare orchids, it might be having a baby. It's your goal, not mine. So back to you. Let's answer those questions again with a new perspective:

1) What ridiculously extraordinary thing do you want to do?

2) Why aren't you doing it right now?

Tanja Hoagland is a minimalist, entrepreneur, and author who speaks out on her blog Minimalist Packrat.

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